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Pancreatitis Mix - McDowell's Herbal Treatments

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 One of the functions of the pancreas is production of digestive enzymes. These are the enzymes that break down ingested foods into molecules the body can digest. These enzymes are carefully handled by the pancreas in order to prevent them from damaging the pancreas itself or surrounding tissue. When these self-protective mechanisms break down for any reason, the result is leakage of enyzmes which damage the pancreas and surrounding tissues. This breakdown is called pancreatitis.

Often, it takes a combination of precipitating factors to cause pancreatitis to occur in a dog or cat. High fat diets, obesity and lack of exercise are the most common "life-style" contributors. Miniature schnauzers are predisposed to pancreatitis due to a tendency to have high levels of lipoproteins in their blood streams.

The main dietary cause of pancreatitis is feeding high fat foods or treats to dogs. There could also be some correlation with high salt content in commercial dog food.

Hyperadrenocorticism, a naturally occurring overproduction of corticosteriods that is fairly common in dogs may also lead to an increased susceptibility to pancreatitis. Anything that interferes with blood supply to the pancreas or release of digestive enzymes by the pancreas may lead to pancreatitis.

Symptoms and signs of pancreatitis include vomiting which is common and depression can also be severe. Affected pets may seem restless or be reluctant to move, they may seem weak, irritable, have diarrhea or simply refuse to eat. Many owners recognize that their pet is very ill but may be baffled by a lack of symptoms to explain their pet's discomfort -- they just know they don't feel well. Dehydration is common in dogs with acute pancreatitis. Rapid heartrate and rapid breathing are sometimes seen with pancreatitis. Poor circulation in capillaries may lead to redness of the gums and eye linings.

I strongly suggest that pancreatitis often comes down to over feeding, overly frequent feeding and too many exotic foods increasing the workload of the dogs metabolism and giving it no rest.

For pancreatitis I would start out with a convalescent diet of a single raw meaty bone daily and nothing else along with a 12 weeks course of my pancreatitis mix . The herbs I include in my pancreatitis mix are Fennel, Liquorice, Slippery Elm, Dandelion, Chamomile, Rosehips, Agrimony and Fenugreek with backh flowers Scleranthus, Agrimony, Clematis, Honeysuckle, Wild Oat  and Rescue Remedy.

Dose: 5 to 10 drops for Tiny and Small Breeds; 10 to 20 drops for Medium and Large breeds. (Please use the "Ask A Question" link below, to ensure you get the best Herbal Program and the correct dose for your sick dog!)

 

 

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Treatments

McDowell's staff Herbalists can not diagnose your disease or illness. What they can do is offer a herbal program to assist with healing, after you have had advice from your doctor or specialist. If you have unexplained pain or symptoms, seek medical advice.

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